California Free Printable Labor Law Posters Posters California Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) Wage Order #14 Agricultural Occupations Poster

 Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) Wage Order #14 Agricultural Occupations PDF

The Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) Wage Order #14 Agricultural Occupations is a labor law posters poster by the California Department Of Industrial Relations. This poster is mandatory for some employers, including employers in agricultural occupations.

This poster must be posted in a conspicuous place where all employees of any Agricultural occupations in California will see it. Employers can also request if they need this poster in another language. This poster describes the standards and laws that must be followed in the Agricultural occupations. Such laws include minimum wage rate, working overtime, holding records, and regulations for disabled workers.


CA All-In-One Labor Poster: Instead of printing out dozens of posters, employers can also purchase an all-in-one poster that covers both California and Federal poster requirements by clicking here .

—	1 	                      	IWC FORM 1114 (Rev. 11/2023) 	 	                     OSP 06 98772	 	
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 	
 
 	
OFFICIAL NOTICE  	
INDUSTRIAL WELFARE COMMISSION 
ORDER NO. 14 -2001  
REGULATING  
WAGES, HOURS AND WORKING CONDITIONS IN THE  	
AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS 	
Effective January 1, 2002 as amended  	
 	
Sections 4(A) and 10(C) amended and republished by the Department of 
Industrial Relations, effective January 1, 2024, pursuant to SB 3, Chapter 4, 
Statutes of 2016 and section 1182.13 of the Labor Code. Sections 1(F), 1(G), 3(A),  3(B), 3(C), 3(E) and 11 am ended and republished effective January 1, 2017, 
pursuant to AB 1066, Chapter 313, Statutes of 2016 and section 864 of the Labor  Code. Section 6 amended and republished pursuant to SB 639, Chapter 339, 
Statutes of 2021 effective January 1, 2022. Sections 1(F), 1(H), 2(I)- (J), 2(N), 4(E), 
7(B), 7(D), 9(B), 10(F)- (H), 11, 12, 13, 18 and 20 pertaining to sheepherders and 
goat herders amended and republished pursuant to SB 156, Chapter 569, 
Statutes of 2022 effective September 27, 2022, SB 143, Chapter 196, Statutes of 
2023 effective September 13, 2023, and sections 2695.2 and 2695.4 of the Labor  Code. 	
This Order Must Be Posted Where Employees Can Read It Easily 
Visit www.dir.ca.gov

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 TAKE NOTICE:  To employers and representatives of persons working in industries and occupations in the State of California: 
The Department of Industrial Relations amends and republishes the minimum wage and meals and lodging credits in the Industrial 
Welfare Commission’s Orders as a result of legislation enacted (SB 3, Ch. 4, Stats of 2016, amending section 1182.12 of the 
Labor Code, and AB 1835, Ch. 230, Stats of 2006, adding sections 1182.12 and 1182.13 to the Labor Code). The Department of 
Industrial Relations also updated this Industrial Welfare Commission Order pursuant to legislation enacted (AB 1066, Ch. 313, 
Stats of 2016, adding sections 857 through 864 to the Labor Code, SB 639, Ch. 339, Stats. 2021 amending sections 1191 and 
1191.5 of the Labor Code,  AB 156, Ch. 569, Stats of 2022, amending sections 2695.1 and 2695.2, and adding sections 2695.3 
and 2695.4. to the Labor Code, and SB 143 (Ch. 196, Stats. 2023) further amending Labor Code sections 2695.3 and 2695.4 of 
the Labor Code).  The updates, amendme nts and republishing make no other changes to this order.  
 
Employers and representatives of persons working in the industry and occupations to which this order applies should note that , 
except as set forth in Labor Code Section 860 and subdivision (a) of Labor Code Section 862, which are reflected in Section 3 of 
this order, all other provisions of Division 2, Part 2, Chapter 1 of the Labor Code (commencing with Section 500) regarding 
compensation for overtime work shall apply to workers in an agricultural occupation commencing January 1, 2017.  (See Labor 
Code Section 861.)  Where this order is inconsistent with Division 2, Part 2, Chapter 6 of the Labor Code (the Phase- In Overtime 
for Agricultural Workers Act of 2016, which incorporates Chapter 1 as stated), Chapter 6 of the Labor Code governs, including  
the applicable effective dates, unless this order provides greater protections or benefits to agricultural employees.  (See Labor 
Code Section 864.)  
1. APPLICABILITY OF ORDER.   
This order shall apply to all persons employed in an agricultural occupation whether paid on a time, piece rate, commission, or 
other basis, except that: 
(A)  No provision of this order shall apply to any employee who is engaged in work which is primarily intellectual, managerial, 
or creative, and which requires exercise of discretion and independent judgment, and for which the remuneration is not 
less than two (2) times the monthly state minimum wage for full -time employment.  
(B)  No provision of this order shall apply to any individual who is the parent, spouse, child, or legally adopted child of the 
employer.  
(C)  Section 5 of this order shall not apply to any employer who employs fewer than five (5) persons covered by this order. If 
at any one time during a calendar year an employer has five (5) or more employees covered by this order, every provision 
of this order, including Section 5, Reporting Time Pay, shall apply to that employer throughout that calendar year.  
(D)  No provision of this order shall apply to any employee covered by Order No. 8 or Order No. 13, relating to industries 
handling products after harvest.  
(E)  The provisions of this order shall not apply to any individual participating in a national service program, such as 
AmeriCorps, carried out using assistance provided under Section 12571 of Title 42 of the United States Code. (See Stats. 
2000, chap. 365, amending Labor Code § 1171.)  
(F)  Sections 4(A) -(D), 5, 6, 9(A), and 11(B), of this order shall not apply to an employee engaged to work as a “sheepherder” 	
 	 	 	 	 	
 	 	 	 	 	 	 	 	
 	
INDUSTRIAL   WELFARE  COMMISSION 
ORDER  NO. 14-2001  
REGUL ATING  
WAGES,  HOURS AND  WORKING  CONDITIONS  IN  THE  	
AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS

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or, effective September 27, 2022, engaged to work as a “goat herder”,” as that occupation is defined in Section 2(N). 
Section 3(A)(1) shall apply to a sheepherder or “goat herder” employed by a large employer (more than 25 employees) 
beginning January 1, 2019, and Section 3(A)(2) shall apply to a sheepherder or goat herder employed by a small employer 
(25 or fewer employees) beginning January 1, 2022.  Otherwise, this order, including Section 4(A), shall apply to any 
workweek during which a sheepherder or goat herder employee is engaged in any non-sheepherding or non-goat herding 
agricultural or other work.  
(G)  Section 3 of this order shall not apply to an employee licensed pursuant to Article 3 (commencing with § 7850) of Chapter 
1 of Part 3 of Division 6 of the Fish and Game Code who serves as a crew member on a commercial fishing vessel. 
Section 3(A)(2) shall apply to a licensed crew member employed by a large employer (more than 25 employees) beginning 
January 1, 2019, and Section 3(A)(3) shall apply to a licensed crew member employed by a small employer (25 or fewer 
employees) beginning January 1, 2022.  
(H)  The provisions of this order that only refer to goat herders, effective September 27, 2022, shall expire on July 1, 2026, 
and goat herders will be afterward protected under the general provisions of this order unless the Legislature amends 
Labor Code secti ons 2695.3 and 2695.4 to extend special provisions for goat herders.  	
2. DEFINITIONS  	
(A)	 “Commission” means the Industrial Welfare Commission of the State of California.  
(B) “Division” means the  Division of Labor Standards Enforcement of the State of California.  
(C) “Employ” means to engage, suffer, or permit to work.  
(D) “Employed in an agricultural occupation,” means any of the following described occupations:  
(1)  The preparation, care, and treatment of farm land, pipeline, or ditches, including leveling for agricultural purposes, 
plowing, discing, and fertilizing the soil;  
(2) The sowing and planting of any agricultural or horticultural commodity;  
(3) The care of any agricultural or horticultural commodity,; as used in this subdivision, “care” includes, but is not limited 
to, cultivation, irrigation, weed control, thinning, heating, pruning, or tying, fumigating, spraying, and dusting;  
(4) The harvesting of any agricultural or horticultural commodity, including but not limited to, picking, cutting, threshing,  
mowing, knocking off, field chopping, bunching, baling, balling, field packing, and placing in field containers or in the 
vehicle  in which the commodity will be hauled, and transportation on the farm or to a place of first processing or 
distribution;  
(5) The assembly and storage of any agricultural or horticultural commodity, including but not limited to, loading, road 
siding, banking, stacking, binding, and piling;  
(6) The raising, feeding and management of livestock, fur bearing animals, poultry, fish, mollusks, and insects, including 
but not limited to herding, housing, hatching, milking, shearing, handling eggs, and extracting honey;  
(7) The harvesting of fish, as defined by Section 45 of the Fish and Game Code, for commercial sale;  
(8) The conservation, improvement or maintenance of such farm and its tools and equipment.  
(E) “Employee” means any person employed by an employer.  
(F) “Employer” means any person as defined in Section 18 of the Labor Code, who directly or indirectly, or through an agent             
or any other person, employs or exercises control over the wages, hours, or working conditions of any person.  
(G) “Hours worked” means the time during which an employee is subject to the control of an employer, and includes all the 
time the employee is suffered or permitted to work, whether or not required to do so.  
(H) “Minor” means, for the purpose of this Order, any person under the age of eighteen (18) years.  
(I) “Non -sheepherding work” means any work except the work defined in section 2(N) below.  
(J) “Open range sheepherding” means, generally, sheepherding on land that is not cultivated, but produces native forage 
(“browse” or herbaceous food that is available to livestock or game animals) for animal consumption, and includes land that 
is re -vegetated naturally or artificially to provide forage cover that is managed like range vegetation. The range may be on 
private, federal, or state land. Typically, the land is not only non- cultivated, but not suitable for cultivation because it is rocky, 
thin, semiarid, or otherwise poor. Also, many acres of range land are required to graze one animal unit (five sheep) for one 
month. By its very nature, open range sheepherding is conducted over wide expanses of land, such as thousands of acres.  
(K) “Outside Salesperson” means any person, 18 years of age or over, who customarily and regularly works more than half 
the working time away from the employer’s place of business selling tangible or intangible items or obtaining orders or 
contracts for pr oducts, services or use of facilities.  
(L) “Piece rate basis” is a method of payment based on units of production or a fraction thereof.  
(M) “Primarily” as used in Section 1, Applicability, means more than one- half the employee’s work time. 
(N) “Sheepherder” or “goat herder”  means an individual who is employed to do any of the following, including with the use of 
trained dogs:  
(1) Tend herds of sheep or goats grazing or browsing on range or pasture.  
(2) Move sheep or goats to and about an area assigned for grazing or  browsing.

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(3) Prevent sheep or goats from wandering or becoming lost. 
(4) Protect sheep or goats against predators and the eating of poisonous plants.  
(5) Assist in the lambing, docking, or shearing of sheep, or in the kidding of goats.  
(6) Provide water or feed supplementary rations to sheep or goats.  
(O) “Shift” means designated hours of work by an employee, with a designated beginning time and quitting time.  
(P) “Split shift” means a work schedule which is interrupted by non- paid non-working periods established by the employer, 
other than bona fide rest or meal periods.  
(Q) “Wages” includes all amounts for labor performed by employees of every description, whether the amount is fixed or 
ascertained by the standard of time, task, piece, commission basis, or other method of calculation.  
(R) “Workday” means any consecutive 24 hours beginning at the same time each calendar day.  
(S) “Workweek” means any seven (7) consecutive days, starting with the same calendar day each week. “Workweek” is a 
fixed and regularly recurring period of 168 hours, seven (7) consecutive 24- hour periods. 	
3. HOURS AND DAYS OF WORK 	
(A) 	The following overtime provisions are applicable to employees eighteen (18) years of age or over and to employees 
sixteen (16) or seventeen (17) years of age who are not required by law to attend school:   
(1) For employers of more than 25 employees:  
(a)  Starting January 1, 2019, an employee shall not be employed more than nine and one- half (9½) hours per 
workday or fifty -five (55) hours per workweek unless the employee receives one and one- half (1½) times such 
employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked over nine and one- half (9½) hours in any one workday or 
more than fifty -five (55) hours in any one workweek.   
(b)  Starting January 1, 2020, an employee shall not be employed more than nine (9) hours per workday or fifty (50) 
hours per workweek unless the employee receives one and one- half (1½) times such employee’s regular rate of 
pay for all hours worked over nine (9) hours in any one workday or more than fifty (50) hours in any one 
workweek.  
(c)  Starting January 1, 2021, an employee shall not be employed more than eight and one- half (8½) hours per 
workday or forty -five (45) hours per workweek unless the employee receives one and one- half (1½) times such 
employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours  worked over eight and one- half (8½) hours in any one workday or 
more than forty -five (45) hours in any one workweek.  
(d)  Starting January 1, 2022, an employee shall not be employed more than eight (8) hours per workday or work in 
excess of forty (40) hours per workweek unless the employee receives one and one- half (1½) times such 
employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked over eight (8) hours in any workday or more than forty (40) 
hours in any workweek and double the employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked over twelve (12) hours 
in any one workday.  
(2) For employers of 25 or fewer employees:  
(a)   Starting January 1, 2022, the overtime standards and compensation in subsection (1)(a) above, shall apply to    
any employee who works over the specified threshold hours in any one workday or workweek.  
(b)   Starting January 1, 2023, the overtime standards and compensation in subsection (1)(b) above, shall apply to 
any employee who works over the specified threshold hours in any one workday or workweek.  
(c)  Starting January 1, 2024, the overtime standards and  compensation in subsection (1)(c) above, shall apply to 
any employee who works over the specified threshold hours in any one workday or workweek.  
(d)   Starting January 1, 2025, the overtime standards and compensation in subsection (1)(d) above, shall apply to 
any employee who works over the specified numbers of hours in any one workday or workweek.  (3)  For 
employers of 25 or fewer employees:  
   (See California Labor Code, Sections 1391 and 1394)  
( VIOLATIONS OF CHILD LABOR LAWS  are subject to civil penalties of from $500 to $10,000 as well as to criminal penalties 
provided herein. Refer to California Labor Code Sections 1285 to 1312 and 1390 to 1399 for additional restrictions on the 
employment of minors. Employers should ask sc hool districts about required work permits.) 
(B)  All employees covered under this order shall not be employed on the seventh (7th) consecutive day of a workweek unless 
the employee receives one and one- half (1½) times such employee’s regular rate of pay for the first eight (8) hours on the 
seventh (7th) consecutive day of work and double the employee’s regular rate of pay for each hour worked over eight (8) on 
the seventh (7th) consecutive day of work in the workweek.    
(C) The provisions of subsection (A) above shall not apply to an employee covered by this order during any week in which 
more than half of such employee’s working time is devoted to performing the duties of an irrigator. Subsection 3(A)(2) shall 
apply to s uch an employee employed by a large employer (more than 25 employees) beginning January 1, 2019, and 
subsection 3(A)(3) shall apply to such an employee employed by a small employer (25 or fewer employees) beginning January 
1, 2022.

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(D) The provisions of this section are not applicable to employees whose hours of service are regulated by: 
(1) The United States Department of Transportation Code of Federal Regulations, title 49, Sections 395.1 to 395.13, 
Hours of Service of Drivers; or  
(2) Title 13 of the California Code of Regulations, subchapter 6.5, sec. 1200 and following sections, regulating hours of 
drivers.  
(E) This section shall not apply to any employee covered by a valid collective bargaining agreement if said agreement 
expressly provides for the wages, hours of work, and working conditions of the employees, and if the agreement provides 
premium wage rates  for all overtime hours worked and a regular hourly rate of pay for those employees of not less than thirty 
percent (30%) more than the state minimum wage.  
(See California Labor Code, Section 514)  	
4. MINIMUM  WAGES 
(A) 	Every employer shall pay to each employee wages not less than the following:  
(1) 	All employers, regardless of the number of employees, shall pay to each employee wages not less than the following:  
(a) Sixteen dollars ($16.00) per hour for all hours worked, effective January 1, 2024, and  
(b) Fifteen dollars and fifty cents ($15.50) per hour for all hours worked, effective January 1, 2023.  	
(2) 	Prior to January 1, 2023, any employer who employs 26 or more employees shall pay to each employee wages not 
less than the following:  
(a) 	 Fifteen dollars ($15.00) per hour for all hours worked, effective January 1, 2022, 	
(b)  	 Fourteen dollars ($14.00) per hour for all hours worked, effective January 1, 2021,  and 	
(c) 	 Thirteen dollars ($13.00) per hour for all hours worked, effective January 1, 2020. 	
(3)  	Prior to January 1, 2023, any employer who employs 25 or fewer employees shall pay to each employee wages not 
less than the following:  
(a) 	 Fourteen dollars ($14.00) per hour for all hours worked, effective January 1, 2022, 	
(b)  	 Thirteen dollars ($13.00) per hour for all hours worked, effective January 1, 2021, and  	
(c) 	 Twelve dollars ($12.00) per hour for all hours worked, effective January 1, 2020. 
Employees treated as employed by a single qualified taxpayer pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code section 23626 are 
treated as employees of that single taxpayer.  LEARNERS: Employees during their first 160 hours of employment in 
occupations in which they have no previous similar or related experience, may be paid not less than 85 percent of the 
minimum wage rounded to the nearest nickel.  
(B) Every employer shall pay to each employee, on the established payday for the period involved, not less than the applicabl e 
minimum wage for all hours worked in the payroll period, whether the remuneration is measured by time, piece, commission, 
or otherwise.  
(C) When an employee works a split shift, one (1)  hour’s pay at the minimum wage shall be paid in addition to the minimum 
wage for that workday, except when the employee resides at the place of employment.  
(D) The provisions of this section shall not apply to apprentices regularly indentured under the State Division of Apprenticeship 
Standards.  	
(E) The monthly  minimum wage for sheepherders   or goat herders  employed on a regularly scheduled 24- hour shift on a 
seven-day-a-week “on call” basis shall be the following:  	
(1) For employers who employ 26 or more employees: effective January 1, 2024, $2,844.48 per month,  effective January 
1, 2023, $2,755.48 per month,	
 effective January 1, 2022, $2,666.68 per month , effective January 1, 2021, $2,488.97 
per month,  effective January 1, 2020, $2,311.24 per month. 
(2) For employers who employ 25 or fewer employees : effective January 1, 2024, $2,844.48  per month,	
 effective 
January 1, 2023, $2,755.48 per month,  effective January 1, 2022, $2,488.97 per month,  effective January 1, 2021, 
$2,311.24 per month,  effective January 1, 2020, $2,133.52 per month.  
Payment of the monthly minimum wage does not relieve an employer of the obligation to compensate for overtime work as 
required in Section 3 of this order.    
(3) Wages paid to sheepherders or goat herders shall not be offset by meals or lodging provided by the employer.	
 	
5. R EPORTING TIME PAY  	
(A) 	Each workday an employee is required to report for work and does report, but is not put to work or is furnished less than 
half said employee’s usual or scheduled day’s work, the employee shall be paid for half the usual or scheduled day’s work, 
but in no event for less than two (2) hours nor more than four (4) hours, at the employee’s  regular rate of pay, which shall not 
be less than the minimum wage.  
(B) If an employee is required to report for work a second time in any one workday and is furnished less than two (2) hours 
of work on the second reporting, said employee shall be paid for two (2) hours at the employee’s regular rate of pay, which

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shall not be less than the minimum wage. 
(C) The foregoing reporting time pay provisions are not applicable when:  
(1) Operations cannot commence or continue due to threats to employees or property; or when recommended by civil 
authorities; or  
(2) Public utilities fail to supply electricity, water, or gas, or there is a failure in the public utilities, or sewer system; or  
(3) The interruption of work is caused by an Act of God or other cause not  within the employer’s control. 
(D) This section shall not apply to an employee on paid standby status who is called to perform assigned work at a time other  
than the employee’s scheduled reporting time.  	
6. LICENSES FOR DISABLED WORKERS  	
(A) 	An existing license may be renewed by the Division authorizing employment of a person whose earning capacity is 
impaired by physical disability or mental deficiency at less than the minimum wage pursuant to the requirements in Labor 
Code section 1191(a). S uch licenses shall be granted only upon joint application of an employer and employee and 
employee’s representative if any. This subsection is operative only until January 1, 2025, or until the phase- out plan described 
in Labor Code section 1191(c) is  released, whichever is later. 
(B)  A special license may be issued to a nonprofit organization such as a sheltered workshop or rehabilitation facility fixing 
special minimum rates to enable the employment of such persons without requiring individual licenses of such employees. 
This subsection is operative only until January 1, 2025.  
(C) All such licenses and special licenses shall be renewed on a yearly basis or more frequently at the discretion of the 
Division.  
(See California Labor Code, Sections 1191 and 1191.5. ) 	
7. R ECORDS  	
(A) 	Every employer shall keep accurate information with respect to each employee I including the following:  
(1) Full name, home address, occupation and social security number.  
(2) Birth date, if under 18 years, and designation as a minor.  
(3) Time records showing when the employee begins and ends each work period. Meal periods, split shift intervals and 
total daily hours worked shall also be recorded. Meal periods during which, operations cease and authorized rest periods 
need not be recorded.  
(4) Total wages paid each payroll period, including value of board, lodging, or other compensation actually furnished to 
the employee.  
(5) Total hours worked in the payroll period and applicable rates of pay. This information shall be made  readily available 
to the employee upon reasonable request.  
(6) When a piece rate or incentive plan is in operation, piece rates or an explanation of the incentive plan formula shall 
be provided to employees. An accurate production record shall be maintained by the employer.  
(B)  Employers of sheepherders or goat herders shall keep accurate information with respect to sheepherder or goat herder 
employees, including an itemized statement showing applicable rates of pay for sheepherding or goat herding and any 
applicable non- sheepherding or non- goat herding agricultural or other work, all deductions, dates of period for which paid, 
name and social security number (if any) of employee, and name of employer.  
(C) Every employer shall semi -monthly or at the time of each payment of wages furnish each employee, either as a detachable 
part of the check, draft, or voucher paying the employee’s wages, or separately, an itemized statement in writing showing: (1) 
all d eductions; (2) the inclusive dates of the period for which the employee is paid; (3) the name of the employee or the 
employee’s social security number; and (4) the name of the employer, provided all deductions made on written orders of the 
employee may be  aggregated and shown as one item.  
(D)  Every employer of a sheepherder or goat herder shall annually notify the sheepherder or goat herder of his or her rights 
and obligations under state and federal law.  
(E) All required records shall be in the English language and in ink or other indelible form, properly dated, showing month, 
day,  and year, and shall be kept on file by the employer for at least three (3) years at the place of employment or at a central 
location within the State of California. An employee’s records shall be available for inspection by the employee upon 
reasonable request.  	
8. CASH SHORTAGE AND BREAKAGE  	
No employer shall make any deduction from the wage or require any reimbursement from an employee for any cash shortage, 
breakage, or loss of equipment, unless it can be shown that the shortage, breakage, or loss is caused by a dishonest or willf ul 
act, or  by the gross negligence of the employee.	
 	
9. UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT

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(A) 	When uniforms are required by the employer to be worn by the employee as a condition of employment, such uniforms 
shall be provided and maintained by the employer. The term “uniform” includes wearing apparel and accessories of distinctive 
design or color. NOTE: This section shall not apply to protective apparel regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health 
Standards Board.  
(B) When tools or equipment are required by the employer or are necessary to the performance of a job, such tools and 
equipment shall be provided and maintained by the employer, except that an employee whose wages are at least two (2) 
times the minimum wage provided herein may be required to provide and maintain hand tools and equipment customarily 
required by the trade or craft. This subsection (B) shall not apply to apprentices regularly indentured under the State Divis ion 
of Apprenticeship Standards. NOT E	
: This section shall not apply to protective equipment and safety devices on tools regulated 
by the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board.  
(C) A reasonable deposit may be required as security for the return of the items furnished by the employer under provisions 
of subsections (A) and (B) of this section upon issuance of a receipt to the employee for such deposit. Such deposits shall be 
made  pursuant to Section 400 and following of the Labor Code or an employer with the prior written authorization of the 
employee may deduct from the employee’s last check the cost of an item furnished pursuant to (A) and (B) above in the event 
said item is not returned. No deduction shall be made at any time for normal wear and tear. All items furnished by the employer 
shall be returned by the employee upon completion of the job.  	
10. Meals and Lodging. 	
(A)	 “Meal” means an adequate, well -balanced serving of a variety of wholesome, nutritious foods.  
(B) “Lodging” means living accommodations available to the employee for full -time occupancy, which are adequate, decent, 
and sanitary according to usual and customary standards. Employees shall not be required to share a bed.  
(C) Meals or lodging may not be credited against the minimum wage without a voluntary written agreement between the 
employer and the employee. When credit for meals or lodging is used to meet part of the employer’s minimum wage obligation, 
the amounts so credited may not be more than the following:  	
EFFECTIVE:	  	JANUARY 1, 202	1 	JANUARY 1, 202	2 	JANUARY 1, 	202	3 	JANUARY 1, 	202	4 	For an employer who employs:	 	26 or	 	More Employees 	25 or Fewer  Employees 	26 or	 	More Employees	 	25 or 	 	Fewer  
Employees  	All Employers regardless of 
number of 
Employees	 	
All Employers regardless of number of 
Employees	 	
LODGING	 	 	 	 	 	 	 	
Room occupied alone	 	$65.83	 	/week  	$61.13	 	/week 	$70.53	 	/week 	$65.83	 	/week 	$72.88	 	/week 	$75.23	 	/week 	
Room shared	 	$54.34	 	/week 	$50.46	 	/week 	$58.22	 	/week 	$54.34	 	/week 	$60.16	 	/week 	$62.10	 	/week 	
Apartment 	? two thirds (2/3) of the ordinary 	rental value, and in no  event more than: 	$790.67	 	/month 	$734.21	 	/month 	$847.12	 	/month 	$790.67	 	/month 	$875.33	 	/month 	$903.60	 	/month 	
Where a couple are both employed by the employer, two thirds (2/3) of the  ordinary rental value, and in no event more than:	 	
$1,169.59	 	/month 	$1,086.07	 	/month 	$1,253.10	 	/month 	$1,169.59	 	/month 	$1,294.83	 	/month 	$1,336.65	 	/month 	
MEALS	 	 	 	 	 	 	 	
Breakfast	  	$5.06	 	$4.70	 	$5.42	 	$5.06	 	$5.	60 	$5.	78 	
Lunch	 	$6.97	 	$6.47	 	$7.47	 	$6.97	 	$7.	72 	$7.	97 	
Dinner	 	$9.35	 	$8.68	 	$10.02	 	$9.35	 	$10.	35 	$10.	68 	
(D) 	Meals, evaluated as part of the minimum wage, must be bona fide meals consistent with the employee’s work shift. 
Deductions shall not be made for meals not received or lodging not used.  
(E) If, as a condition of employment, the employee must live at the place of employment or occupy quarters owned or under 
the control of the employer, then the employer may not charge rent in excess of the values listed herein.  
(F)  Paragraphs (C), (D), and (E) above shall not apply to sheepherders or goat herders. Every employer shall provide to each 
sheepherder or goat herder not less than the minimum monthly meal and lodging benefits required to be provided by 
employers of sheepher ders or goat herders employed under the provisions of the H -2A program of the federal Immigration 
and Nationality Act [8 U.S.C. Section 1101 et seq.], or any successor provisions.  
(G)  Fixed Site Housing: A sheepherder or goat herder not engaged in open range sheepherding or goat herding, shall be 
provided with fixed site housing that complies with all the following standards and requirements:  
(1) Toilets (which may include portable toilets) and bathing facilities (which may include a portable facility).  
(2) Heating (which may  include a camp stove or other sources of heat).  
(3) Indoor Lighting.

—
 	
 	
(4) Potable hot and cold water. 
(5) Cooking facilities and utensils.  
(6) Refrigeration for perishable foodstuffs (which may include ice chests, provided that ice is delivered to the sheepherder,  
as needed, to maintain a continuous temperature required to retard spoilage and assure food safety).  
(7)  Fixed Site Housing Inspections: housing that is erected for sheepherders or goat herders at fixed locations shall be 
annually inspected by the State of California Employment Development Department for compliance with Paragraph (F) 
of this section, unless t he employer receives a statement in writing from the Employment Development Department that 
there are no such inspectors available.  
(H)  Mobile Housing: When a sheepherder or goat herder is engaged in open range sheepherding or goat herding, the 
employer shall provide mobile housing that complies with all specified standards and inspection requirements prescribed for 
mobile sheepherder or goat herder housing under either of the following, whichever affords the greater protection or benefit:   
(1) Housing requirements established by the United States Department of Labor then in effect (see, 20 CFR section   
655.235); or  
   (2) Housing requirements provided in Labor Code sections 2695.2(f) or 1695.4(f).   
Such housing shall be inspected and approved annually by an inspector from the Employment Development Department 
unless the employer receives a statement in writing from the Employment Development Department that there are no such 
inspectors available.  	
11. MEAL PERIODS  	
(A) 	An employer may not employ an employee for a work period of more than five (5) hours without providing the employee 
with a meal period of not less than 30 minutes, except that when a work period of not more than six (6) hours will complete 
the day’s work t he meal period may be waived by mutual consent of employer and employee. Unless the employee is relieved 
of all duty during a 30 minute meal period, the meal period shall be considered an “on duty” meal period and counted as time 
worked. An “on duty” meal period shall be permitted only when the nature of the work prevents an employee from being 
relieved of all duty and when by written agreement between the parties an on- the-job paid meal period is agreed to.  An 
employer of a sheepherder or goat herder may be relieved of this obligation if a meal period of 30 minutes cannot reasonably 
be provided because no one is available to relieve a sheepherder or goat herder tending flock alone on that day.  Where a 
meal period of 30 minutes can be provided but not with out interruption, a sheepherder or goat herder shall be allowed to 
complete the meal period during that day.  
(B) An employer may not employ an employee for a work period of more than ten (10) hours per day without providing the 
employee with a second meal period of not less than 30 minutes, except that if the total hours worked is no more than 12 
hours, the second meal period may be waived by mutual consent of the employer and the employee only if the first meal 
period was not waived.  
(See California Labor Code, Section 512)  	
12. REST PERIODS  	
Every employer shall authorize and permit all employees to take rest periods, which insofar as practicable shall be in the mi ddle 
of each work period. The authorized rest period time shall be based on the total hours worked daily at the rate of ten (10) 
mi nutes net rest time per four (4) hours or major fraction thereof. However, a rest period need not be authorized for employees  
whose total daily work time is less than three and one- half (3½) hours. Authorized rest period time shall be counted, as hours 
wor ked for which there shall be no deduction from wages.  This section applies to sheepherders and goat herders to the extent 
practicable.  	
13. SEATS  	
When the nature of the work reasonably permits the use of seats, suitable seats shall be provided for employees working on 
or at a machine.  	
14. OTHER WORKING CONDITIONS APPLICABLE TO SHEEPHERDERS  AND GOAT HERDERS  	
Sheepherders and goat herders shall be provided with all of the following at each work site:  
(A) Regular mail service, which, in the case of open range locations, shall mean mail delivery not less frequently than once 
every seven days.  
(B)  An appropriate means of communication, including but not limited to a radio and/or telephone, which will allow 
sheepherders and goat herders to communicate with employers, health care providers, an emergency relating to the herding 
operation, and government regulators. Employers may charge sheepherders or goat herders for all others uses.  Nothing in 
this paragraph shall preclude an employer from providing additional means of communication to the sheepherder or goat 
herder which are appropriate because  telephones or radios are out of range or otherwise inoperable.  
(C) Visitor access to fixed site housing and, when practicable, to mobile housing.

—
 	
 
15. EXEMPTIONS  	
If, in the opinion of the Division after due investigation, it is found that the enforcement of any provisions in Section 7,  Records; 
Section 11, Meal Periods; Section 12, Rest Periods; or Section 13, Seats, would not materially affect the welfare or comfort of 
employees and would work an undue hardship on the employer, exemption may be made at the discretion of the Division. Such 
exemptions shall be in writing to be effective and may be revoked after reasonable notice is given in writing. Application for 
e xemption shall be made by the employer or by the employee and/or the employee’s representative to the Division in writing. A 
copy of the application is filed with the Division.  	
16. FILING REPORTS  	
(See California Labor Code, Section 1174(a))  	
17. INSPECTION  	
(See California Labor Code, Section 1174)  	
18. PENALTIES   	
(See California Labor Code, Section 1199)  
(A)  In addition to any other civil penalties provided by law, any employer or any other person acting on behalf of the employer 
who violates, or causes to be violated, the provisions of this order, shall be subject to the civil penalty of:  
(1) Initial Violation -  $50 for each underpaid employee for each pay period during which the employee was underpaid in 
addition to an amount which is sufficient to recover unpaid wages.  
(2) Subsequent Violations -  $100 for each underpaid employee for each pay period during which the employee was 
underpaid in addition to an amount which is sufficient to recover unpaid wages.  
(B) Any employer or any other person acting on behalf of the employer who employs sheepherders and who requires them 
to engage in non- sheepherding duties shall be subject to the following penalties:  
(1) Initial violations -  a civil penalty of one week’s pay computed on a basis of a 60- hour workweek and a wage of no less 
than the current minimum wage in effect.  
(2) Second violation -  a civil penalty of one month’s pay computed on a basis of a 252 -hour month and a wage of no less 
than the current minimum wage in effect.  
(3) Third and subsequent violation  - a civil penalty equal to the cost of the contract of the approved “H -2A” job order.  
(C) In addition to any other civil penalties provided by law, any employer or any other person acting on behalf of the employ er 
who violates, or causes to be violated, the provisions of Labor Code Sections 2695.2 or 2695.4, including provisions of this 
ord er relating to a sheepherder or goat herder, shall be subject to the civil penalty of:  
(1) Initial Violation -  $100.00 for each underpaid employee for each pay period during which the employee was underpaid 
in addition to an amount which is sufficient to recover unpaid wages.  
(2) Subsequent Violations  -  $250.00 for each underpaid employee for each pay period during which the employee was 
underpaid in addition to an amount which is sufficient to recover unpaid wages.  
(D) The affected employee shall receive payment of all wages recovered.  
(E) The Labor Commissioner may also issue citations pursuant to Labor Code Section 1197.1 for non- payment of wages for 
overtime work in violation of this order.  	
19. SEPARABILITY  	
If the application of any provision of this order, or any section, subsection, subdivision, sentence, clause, phrase, word, or 
portion of this order should be held invalid or unconstitutional or unauthorized or prohibited by statute, the remaining prov isions 
thereof shall not be affected thereby, but shall continue to be given full force and effect as if the part so held invalid or  
unconstitutional had not been included herein.  	
20. POSTING OF ORDER  	
Every employer shall keep a copy of this order posted in an area frequented by employees where it may be easily read during 
the workday. Where the location of work or other conditions make this impractical, every employer shall keep a copy of this 
order and make it available to every employee upon request.  A copy of this order shall be posted and made available in a 
language understood by the sheepherder or goat herder.  
Note: Authority cited: Sections 864, 1173, and 1182.13, Labor Code; and California Constitution, Article XIV, Section 1. 
Reference: Sections 858, 859, 860, 861, 862, 864, 1182, 1182.12, 1182.13, and 1184, and 2695.2, Labor Code.

—
 	
 	
QUESTIONS ABOUT ENFORCEMENT of the Industrial Welfare Commission orders 
and reports of violations should be directed to the Labor Commissioner's Office. A listing 
of offices is on the back of this wage order. For the address and telephone number of the 
office nearest you, information  can be found on the internet at http:// 
www.dir.ca.gov/DLSE/dlse.html  or under a search for "California Labor Commissioner's 
Office" on the internet or any  other directory. The Labor Commissioner has offices in the 
following cities: Bakersfield, El Centro, Fresno, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Oakland, 
Redding, Sacramento, Salinas, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, 
Santa Ana, Santa Barbara, Santa Rosa, Stockton, Van  Nuys.

—	
 	
 
For further information or to file your complaints, visit https://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/dlse.html	 or  contact the State of California at the following department offices:  	 California Labor  Commissioner's  Office,  also known  as,  Division  of  Labor  Standards  Enforcement  (DLSE)  
 
BAKERSFIELD  Labor	 Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	REDDING Labor	 Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	SAN JOSE  Labor Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	7718 Meany	 Ave.	 	Bakersfield, CA   93308 
661 -587 -3060  	250 Hemsted Drive, 2nd Floor, Suite	 A 	Redding, CA   96002 530-225 -2655  	
224 Airport Parkway, Suite 300	 	San Jose, CA 95110  
408 -277 -1266  	
 EL CENTRO  
Labor  Commissioner's  Office/DLSE  
1550 W.  Main St. 
El Centro, CA  92 243	
  
760 -353 -0607  	
 	SACRAMENTO  
Labor  Commissioner's  Office/DLSE  
2031 Howe Ave, Suite  100 
Sacramento, CA  95825  
916 -263 -1811  	 	SANTA  ANA 
Labor Commissioner's  Office/DLSE  
 2 MacArthur Place Suite 800	 
Santa Ana, CA   9270 7 
714 -558 -4910  	
 FRESNO  
Labor  Commissioner's  Office/DLSE  
770 E. Shaw Ave., Suite 222	 	
 	SALINAS 
Labor  Commissioner's  Office/DLSE  
950	 E. Blanco	 Rd.,	 Suite	 204	 	
 	SANTA BARBARA  
Labor Commissioner's  Office/DLSE 
411 E. Canon 	Perdido, 	Room	 3 	Fresno, CA 	 93710	 	Salinas, CA	 93901	 	Santa Barbara, CA 	 93101	 	559	-244	-5340	 	831	-443	-3041	 	805	-568	-1222	 	
LONG	 BEACH	 	SAN	 BERNARDINO	 	 	
Labor	 Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	1500 Hughes Way, Suite C	-202	 	Labor	 Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	464 West 4	th  Street, Room	 348	 	SANTA	 ROSA	 	Labor Commissioner's 	Office/DLSE	 	Long Beach, CA 	 908	10 	San Bernardino, CA 	 92401	 	50 ?D? Street, Suite	 360	 	562	-590	-5048	 	909	-383	-4334	 	Santa Rosa, CA 	 95404	 	
 	 	707	-576	-2362	 	
LOS	 ANGELES	 	SAN	 DIEGO	 	 	Labor	 Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	Labor	 Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	STOCKTON	 	320	 W. Fourth	 St.,	 Suite	 450	 	7575 Metropolitan	 Dr., Room	 210	 	Labor Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	Los Angeles,  CA	 90013	 	San Diego, CA 	 92108	 	3021 Reynolds Ranch Parkway, Suite 160	 	213	-620	-6330	 	619	-220	-5451	 	Lodi	, CA	 952	40 	
 	 	209	-948	-7771	 	
OAKLAND	 	SAN	 FRANCISCO	 	 	Labor	 Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	1515	 Clay	 Street,	 Room	 801	 	Labor	 Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	455 Golden Gate Ave. 10	th  Floor	 	VAN	 NUYS	 	Labor	 Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	Oakland,  CA	 94612	 	San Francisco, CA 	 94102	 	6150 Van 	Nuys 	Boulevard, Room	 206	 	510	-622	-3273	 	415	-703	-5300	 	Van Nuys, CA 	 91401	 	
 	 	818	-901	-5315	 	
OAKLAND	 – HEADQUARTERS	 	 	 	Labor	 Commissioner's	 Office/DLSE	 	 	 	1515	 Clay	 Street,	 Room	 1302	 	 	 	Oakland, CA	 94612	 	 	 	510	-285	-2118	 	 	 	[email protected]	 	 	 	
 
EMPLOYERS: Do not send copies of your  alternative workweek	 election ballots or election  procedures. 
Only the results of the  alternative workweek election	
 shall be mailed  to:  
 	
 	Department of Industrial  Relations  
Office of Policy, Research and  Legislation 
P.O.  Box 420603  
San Francisco, CA  94142 -0603	
 (415)  703- 4780

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